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  • Middle School Students Skyping With A Class in Sweden

    Middle School Students Skyping With A Class in Sweden

  • 8th Grade Volleyball: 2017 White County Champions!

    8th Grade Volleyball: 2017 White County Champions!

  • Congratulations to Lucas Borja! Honorable Mention INTESOL Student Art Contest

    Congratulations to Lucas Borja! Honorable Mention INTESOL Student Art Contest

  • November Middle School Student of the Month: Rylie Carter

    November Middle School Student of the Month: Rylie Carter

  • November High School Student of the Month: Cade Marlatt

    November High School Student of the Month: Cade Marlatt

Guidance News and Timeline for Success

  • Guidance News

    Our Favorite Sites
    NCAA Clearinghouse

    CampusTours.com - Recommended by Business Week for seniors making college decisions. A source for virtual college tours, campus maps, and college videos.

    Twenty-First Century Scholars Program (Link: Twenty-First Century Scholars Application)
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    Online Transcripts and College Information
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  • SAT & PSAT

    About PSAT/NMSQT

    The PSAT will be given to any interested Sophomore or Junior on Wednesday, October 15, 2008. The testing period will begin at 8:00 am and conclude approximately 11:00 am.

    Why should you take the PSAT? The most common reasons for taking the PSAT/NMSQT are:
    • to receive feedback on your strengths and weaknesses on skills necessary for college study. You can then focus your preparation on those areas that could most benefit from additional study or practice.
    • to see how your performance on an admissions test might compare with that of others applying to college.
    • to enter the competition for scholarships from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation.
    • to help prepare for the SAT. You can become familiar with the kinds of questions and the exact directions you will see on the SAT.
    • to receive information from colleges when you check "yes" to Student Search Service.
    • Students must register in the guidance office to be allowed to take the PSAT.

    SAT and PSAT Registration and Test Preparation


    Registration packets for the SAT and ACT tests are available in the guidance office. For a list of test sites, registration procedures, and registration deadlines, check the registration packets or visit the following websites:

    ACT - http://www.actstudent.org

    SAT - http://www.collegeboard.com

    Test preparation materials are available in the guidance office.

    In addition to the ACT and SAT websites, students may find online test
    preparation resources at the following websites:

    Test Prep Review - http://www.testprepreview.com

    Number2.com - http://www.number2.com

    Seniors planning to apply to college should take the tests as soon as possible. Juniors are encouraged to take the test in the spring. North White's school code for the SAT and ACT is 152365.

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  • Freshman

    • As soon as you can, meet with your counselor to develop your 4 year plan and begin talking about colleges and careers.
    • Get off to a good start with your grades. The grades you earn in ninth grade will be included in your high school GPA and class rank.
    • College might seem a long way off now, but grades really do count toward college admission and scholarships.
    • Explore your interests and possible careers.
    • Get involved in extracurricular activities (both school and non-school sponsored).
    • Keep track of awards and community service (important for college admissions and scholarships)

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  • Sophomore

    • In October, take the PSAT. When you fill out your test sheet, check the box that releases your name to colleges so you can start receiving brochures from them.
    • Become familiar with general college entrance requirements.
    • The people who read college applications aren't looking just for grades. Get involved in activities outside the classroom. Work toward leadership positions in the activities that you like best. Become involved in community service and other volunteer activities.
    • Keep your grades up so you can have the highest GPA and class rank possible.
    • Register with the vocational specialist to complete the Choices program.
    • Begin zeroing in on the type of college you would prefer (two-year or four-year, small or large, rural or urban).
    • If you are interested in attending a military academy, now is the time to start planning and getting information.
    • Write to colleges and ask for their academic requirements for admission.
    • Visit a few college campuses.
    • Attend college fairs.
    • Keep putting money away for college. Get a summer job.

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  • Junior

    Fall
    • Take a long, hard look at why you want to continue your education after high school so you will be able to choose the best college or university for your needs.
    • Make a list of colleges that meet your most important criteria (size, location, distance from home, majors, academic rigor, housing, and cost). Weigh each of the factors according to their importance to you.
    • Check your class rank. Even if your grades haven't been that good so far, it's never too late to improve. Colleges like to see an upward trend.
    • If you didn't do so in the tenth grade, sign up for and take the PSAT.
    • If you didn't complete the Choices program in tenth grade, register with the vocational specialist to do so.
    • Make sure you have a social security number.
    • Speak to college representatives who visit your school.
    • If you want to participate in Division I or Division II sports in college, start the certification process.
    Winter
    • Collect information about college application procedures, entrance requirements, tuition and fees, room and board costs, student activities, course offerings, faculty composition, accreditation, and financial aid.
    • Begin narrowing down your college choices.
    Spring
    • Meet with your counselor to review senior year course selection and graduation requirements.
    • Stay involved with your extracurricular activities. Colleges look for consistency and depth in activities.
    • Consider whom you will ask to write your recommendations. Think about asking teachers who know you well and who will write positive letters about you. Letters from a coach, activity leader, or an adult who knows you well outside of school are also valuable.
    • Request applications from schools you're interested in by mail , via the Internet, or in the guidance office.
    Summer
    • Visit the campuses of your top-five college choices.
    • Talk to people you know who have attended the colleges in which you are interested.
    • Volunteer in your community.

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  • Senior

    Fall
    • Keep working on your grades.
    • Continue to participate in extracurricular and volunteer activities.
    • Make a calendar showing application deadlines for admission, financial aid, and scholarships.
    • Check resource books, computer programs, and your guidance office for information on scholarships and grants. Ask colleges about scholarships for which you may apply.
    • Submit college applications to schools by December 1
    Winter
    • Attend financial aid workshops with your parents.
    • Fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
    • Follow up to make sure that the colleges have received all application information.
    Spring
    • Keep working hard in school.
    • Watch the mail for acceptance notifications from colleges.
    • Watch your mail for notification of financial aid awards.
    • Make your final college choice, and notify all schools of your intent by May 1.
    • Be sure that you have received a FAFSA acknowledgment.
    • Keep searching for financial aid opportunities.

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Daily, Early Release (Wed.) and 2 Hour

2016-2017 North White High School Course Catalog

Award Programs

D.A.R. Good Citizen
The DAR Good Citizen award is sponsored by the Daughters of the American Revolution. This award goes to a senior who is selected by staff based on the qualities of dependability, service, leadership, and patriotism.

Hoosier Girls and Boys State
Each year the American Legion Auxiliary sponsors young women and men to attend Hoosier Boys or Girls State. This is an exciting week-long experience that enables them to learn about our political structure and patriotism. Each school chooses one delegate and one alternate for Hoosier Boys and Girls State. To qualify for Hoosier State, you must be enrolled in an Indiana school, be a junior, and should be in the upper third of their class academically.

Hugh O'Brian Leadership Award
The Hugh O’Brian Youth Foundation Leadership Seminars, otherwise known as HOBY, are held in all fifty states, Canada, Hong Kong, Israel, and Mexico. The purpose of these seminars is to bring together a select group of high school sophomores who have demonstrated leadership ability so that they can interact with groups of distinguished leaders in business, government, education, and the professions to discuss present and future issues.

Students are motivated to accept the challenge of leadership and catch a vision of what can be. All aspects of the leadership seminar are geared to encourage the students to see leadership as a life long goal worth pursuing. North White faculty selects a Hugh O’Brian Ambassador and an alternate in case the ambassador cannot attend.

I Dare You Leadership Award
The I Dare You Leadership award is presented each year by the American Youth Foundation in cooperation with principals, counselors, county 4-H agents, church groups and other organizations across the country. This award challenges young people to achieve their highest potential and to influence others through the lives of service. I Dare You asks each school to choose one boy and one girl in the junior class to represent them for this award.

Indiana Leadership Seminars
The Indiana Leadership Seminars are handled the same as the Hugh O’Brian Leadership Award. One sophomore from each high school throughout the western half of Indiana is invited to partake in this seminar. They again ask the school to nominate one delegate and one alternate for this award.

Lugar Symposium
Each year Senator Richard Lugar hosts the Richard Lugar Symposium for tomorrow’s leaders. The symposium focuses on current national issues. Students participate in three mini sessions while at the symposium. To qualify for the selection of the Richard Lugar Symposium, you must be in the junior class, rank in the upper third and demonstrate leadership and communication abilities. This award is voted on by staff.

Perfect Attendance
To be eligible for a perfect attendance award, students can not have any tardies or unexcused absences throughout the entire year. Perfect attendance awards are given at the end of each school year.

President's Education AwardTo be eligible for the President’s Education Award, students must meet the following criteria: be a senior and earn a GPA of 10.0 on a 12 point scale along with achieving in the 85th percentile or higher in math or reading on their SAT scores.

Principal's Leadership Award
The Principal’s Leadership Award program, sponsored by Herff Jones, INC., is given to a senior for demonstrated ability to combine academic excellence and exemplary leadership roles in school and in community activities. This is also voted on by staff of North White High School.

Toyota Community Scholars Program
The goal of the Toyota Community Scholars Program is to recognize one senior who has an outstanding academic record, is an effective leader, and has a well-documented record of service within and outside the school setting. Academic performance is a prime factor in the selection process, but the distinguishing characteristics are the overall impact of the student’s contribution in the area of community service. The nominee must also have maintained a GPA of 3.0 at the time of selection. This award is voted on by staff of North White High School.

Wendy's High School Heisman Award
The National Association of Secondary School Principals and the downtown athletic club of New York City along with Wendy’s recognizes academic achievement, community service, and athletic accomplishments of high school seniors. Each school selects one male and one female in the senior class for this award.

WHAYLE
Associated with the Indiana Leadership Seminar is the WHAYLE (Wicked Hardcore Awesome Youth Leadership Extravaganza). They invite five outstanding sophomore leaders at each school to attend this workshop. Students are again chosen by North White staff and should demonstrate good leadership qualities, but should not be attending the Indiana Leadership Conferences.

Academics

Click to earn more about your Graduation/Diploma Requirements and our Acadmic Awards Program

Academic Honors Program


To be eligible for an academic honors diploma, a student must complete a minimum of forty-seven (47) high school credits. The following areas and courses are required:
  1. Language Arts - 8 credits
  2. Social Studies - 6 credits
  3. Mathematics - 8 credits
  4. Science - 6 credits
  5. Foreign Language - 6 or 8 credits
  6. Fine Arts - 2 credits
  7. Health and Safety - 1 credit
  8. Basic Physical Education - 1 credit

In addition to the minimum course requirements prescribed above, courses counting toward an academic honors diploma are subject to the following requirements:
  1. Language arts credits must include literature, composition, and speech.
  2. In addition to required courses in government and U.S. history, social studies credits must include courses with a major emphasis on economics and geography and/or world history.
  3. Mathematics credits must include Algebra Level II and at least one upper level mathematics course from those listed or a program of equal rigor. If a student has completed a junior high school curriculum that is equivalent to high school Algebra Level I and is placed in high school Algebra Level II, that student must earn only six (6) high school mathematics credits.
  4. Science credits must include:
    1. Two (2) credits in biology:
    2. Two (2) credits in chemistry or two (2) credits in physics; and
    3. Two (2) credits in:
      1. (i) chemistry, physics, earth/space science, advanced biology, advanced chemistry, or advanced physics; or
      2. (ii) a program of equal rigor.
  5. Foreign language credits must include:
    1. Six (6) credits in one (1) language; or
    2. Four (4) credits in one (1) language and four (4) in another. If a student has completed a junior high school curriculum that is equivalent to a Level I high school foreign language and is placed in a Level II high school foreign language, that student must earn only four (4) credits in that language or two (2) credits in that language and four (4) credits in another foreign language.
  6. Only courses that have been approved by the department on recommendation of a review committee and in which a student has earned a grade of “C” or above may count toward an academic honors diploma.

The School Corporation shall note the awarding of an academic honors diploma on the student’s grade transcript.

The School Corporation shall inform students, parents, and guardians of the availability of an academic honors diploma.

Indiana Core 40

Starting in the fall of 1994, students entering the ninth grade must enroll in the Indiana Core 40. All students must work toward completing the requirements of Core 40.

Students must complete the Core 40 to be considered for admission to Indiana’s four-year colleges. The same courses are strongly suggested for admission to a two-year public college or entry into the workforce. Complete the Core 40 by:

1. Taking 28 to 30 credits from this list.
  • Language Arts 8 credits in literature, composition, and speech
  • Mathematics 6-8 credits of Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Trigonometry, Calculus
  • Science 6 credits in laboratory science from the following:
    • 2 - Biology
    • 2 - Chemistry and /or Physics and Integrated Chemistry/Physics
    • 2 - additional credits from Chemistry, Physics, Earth/Space Science, Adv. Biology, Adv. Chemistry, Adv. Physics
  • Social Studies 6 credits distributed as follows:
    • 2 U.S. History
    • 1 U.S. Government
    • 1 Economics
    • 1 World History and/or Geography
    • 1 additional course from above or other social studies area
  • Physical Ed. 1 credit (two semesters)
  • Health/Safety 1 credit (one semester)

2. Choosing 8 credits in courses from the list above or the list below.
  • Foreign Languages Such as Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Russian, or Spanish
  • Arts Art, Music or Drama
  • Computers Computer Applications.
  • Career Area At least 6 credits in a logical sequence from a technical career area.
3. Choosing 2 to 4 more credits from any courses at your school.

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